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Wellesley College fie^us 

Entered as second-class matter November 17, 1916, at the post office at Framingham, Mass., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



VOL. XXVIII. 



FRAMINGHAM AND WELLESLEY, MASS., APRIL 15, 1920 



No. 24 



New Plan Adopted by Societies 
Approved by Academic Council 

During the last week before vacation the six 
societies voted to accept for one year the plan for 
reorganization which had been presented some 
time before by a committee composed of alumnae 
and students. The plan went then before the 
Academic Council for approval. 

Number op Society Members to be Reduced. 

The plan provides, first, for a reduction in the 
number of society members to two hundred and 
ten, thirty-five girls in each society to be chosen 
from the junior and senior classes. A fixed aca- 
demic standing shall be necessary for membership. 
This academic standard shall not be made public. 

The mechanical work which the new system 
necessitates is to be in the hands of a Central 
Committee, consisting of a faculty chairman, elec- 
ted by the societies for two years, and one senior 
member from each society. 
No "Eligibility," So Called Under The New 
Plan. 

Under this new plan there will be no question 
of "eligibility" so much discussed under the present 
plan. Application for society membership is to 
be made by the individual desiring it any time 
after mid-years of her sophomore year. With her 
application she must name her preference or pre- 
ferences, any number, among the societies. She 
may at any time withdraw her application; or she 
may renew her application or alter her preferences 
within a period of time to be fixed by the Inter- 
society Council. 

Each society during the spring term shall re- 
ceive from the Central Committee a complete list 
of the non-society members of the junior and 
senior classes of the following year. On this list 
each society member shall check her nominations 
which are unlimited in number. The president of 
each society shall send to the Central Committee 
the compilation of these individual nominations 
which shall be the final list of nominations for the 
society. 

After college has reoponed in the fall the Cen- 
tral Committee will return the nominating list to 
each society. No girl shall be on this list that had 
not been on the nomination list of the preceding 
spring. The fall list will be the shorter, however, 
for the names of students who have not met the 
required academic standard, or who in the opinion 
of the Executive Board of the College Government 
Association are guilty of seriously disloyal con- 
duct, will have been removed by the Central Com- 
mittee. 

On this returned list, each member of the society 
shall vote, in order of her preference for at least 
thirty juniors and thirty seniors. After this vote 
(Continued on page 3, column 1) 

YE WHO WANT LEGENDAS! 



ALL-COLLEGE ELECTIONS. 



Alumnae and undergraduates— please note this. 

The Legendas will be on sale before long (as 
soon as we subdue the printer), and only those 
who have paid their "dollar down" are entitled to 
this thrilling volume. If you want one and have 
not ordered it, send the dollar at once, with your 
name end address to Elizabeth Spaulding, Tower 
Court. ■ This is the only way that you can get a 
Legenda, for the undersigned announces that she 
is not responsible for those who expect compli- 
mentary copies. 

Don't wait until it is too late I 

E. T. Holmes, 

Editor of the Legenda. 



The second all-college elections were announced 
at cheering, March 25th. All the nominees, who 
had previously had tea at Shakespeare, marched 
to cheering where the final elections were an- 
nounced and new officers cheered. The Sopho- 
mores completed the cheering by the unexpected 
and unconventional announcement of 1921's Hon- 
orary Member. 

A small messenger boy from 1920 presented each 
of the other classes with charming Easter bonnets. 
To the Juniors, he brought a lovely, blue, floppy 
creation. The Sophomore's purple hat was tailored 
and trimmed with '20's color, rose. To the Fresh- 
man, he delivered a green turban, covered with 
daisies and fitting close over the ears. A French 
maid appeared to place the bonnets on the presi- 
dent's heads — just so! 

The result of the elections was as follows: 

Fire Chief .' Josephine Rathbone, 

Experimenter 

Editor-in-chief Ruth Metzger, 

College Government 

Yice Pres Marion Smith, 

Treas Harriet Holcomb, 

Secretary Emmavail Luce, 

Athletic Association 

Treas Dorothy Blossom, 

Secretary Nancy Thurman, 

Custodian Ida Webber, 

Barnswallows 

Treas Julia Roth, 

Secretary Nora Cleveland, 

Custodian Theodora Perry, 

Debating Club 

Vice-Pres Ada Haeseler, 

Secretary Carol Ingham, 

Christian Association 

Vice-Pres Catherine Mitchell, 

Treas Martha Hanna, 

Secretary Elizabeth Bryan, 

Undergraduate Field Member .. Emily Gordon, 

■Chin. Membership Com Marcia Cressy, 

Chm. Conference Com Elizabeth Rand, 

Chm. Extension Com Janet Travell, 

Chm. General Aid Com Lucy Thorn, 

Chm. Social Com Dorothy Tower, 

Chm. Publicity Com Mary Giddings, 

I. C. S. A. 
President Nancy Toll, '22 



A HOOVER CLUB TO BE ORGANIZED. 



Members of the College, both faculty and stu- 
dents, who are interested in having Mr. Hoover 
presented as a candidate for the presidential nom- 
ination were invited to meet in Room 124 of 
Founders Hall on Tuesday, April 13, at 4.30, for 
the purpose of forming a Wellesley Hoover Club. 
The names of those calling the meeting are: 

Ellen F. Pendleton, Katharine Lee Bates, Eliza- 
beth Kimball Kendall, Adeline B. Hawes, Sophie 
C. Hart, Hamilton C. Macdougall, Eliza H. Ken- 
drick, Louise S. McDowell, Margaret P. Sherwood, 
Alice V. Waite, Martha Hale Shackford, Julia 
Swift Orvis, Donald S. Tucker, Edward E. Curtis, 
Agnes F. Perkins, Elizabeth W. Manwaring, Char- 
lotte S. Hasselt, '20, Helen C. Barnard, '20, 
Katharine Taylor, '20, Mavis C. Barnett, '20, 
Katharine B. Scott, '20, Margaret W. Haddock, 
'21, Marion C. Smith, '21, Elinor B. Snow, '21, 
Mildred C. Hesse, '21, Thelma I. Bowman, '21, 
Elizabeth K. Sayre, '21, Emmavail Luce, '22, 
Elizabeth Fry, '22, Dorothy Underhill, '22, Mar- 
garet J. Zeiser, '23. 



Plea for Support of 

Repertoire Theatre 



Mrs. Gulick Speaks at 
Community Sing 



A plea for Wellesley's support of the Jewett 
Repertoire Theatre by Mrs. E. L. Gulick was the 
principal feature at the community sing in the 
Barn on Saturday evening, April 10. The singing, 
because of the poor attendance, fell far short of 
success. 

Mrs. Gulick, of the class of 1887, first spoke 
concerning a Wellesley membership in the Frances 
Jewett Repertoire Theatre Club. This club was or- 
ganized to gain funds for a new theatre which will 
be a surer place for the Henry Jewett players. 
A street is soon to be passed through the location 
of the Copley theatre, and no other place is avail- 
able for the players. Mrs. Gulick spoke of the 
remarkable work of these players, and of their 
courage in maintaining this repertoire theatre 
through many difficulties. The Frances Jewett 
Repertoire Theatre Club is a plan by which the 
club members may go to a Shakespeare matinee 
given exclusively for them once a month. After 
the matinee they are invited to tea where they have 
the privilege of meeting the actors and discussing 
the plays with them. The price of a membership, 
which will continue through college, is five dollars 
for freshmen, four dollars for sophomores, three 
dollars for juniors, and two dollars for seniors. 
There is no doubt that this repertoire theatre, 
which is the only one of its kind in the country, 
sets a very high standard in acting. It is one of 
the assets of Boston which Wellesley should be 
interested in maintaining. 

After Mrs. Gulick's talk Marjorie Perkins led 
the singing, which was interrupted by several 
stunts. Margaret Metzger, from far China, carried 
out a tableau of a tight-rope scene. Frances 
Morgan's Artistic Interpretations followed this, 
and proved to be not only artistic but very clever- 
ly given as well. The Song Leader's Dream pre- 
sented a realistic nightmare of Wellesley's singing, 
which was broken into by Laura Chandler. She 
appealed to everyone to wake up from the night- 
mare and make singing something which Wellesley 
could be proud of. The results of a little prac- 
tice were very apparent, even with the few who 
were present. 



SILVER BAY MOVIES SHOWN AT 
WELLESLEY. 



Silver Bay girls of all years past, present and 
future will be interested in seeing the movies taken 
of the June Conferences at Silver Bay. There 
will no doubt be pictures of the famous baseball 
game in which Mr. Gilkey made a sensational 
slide for home and in which Dr. Fosdick was 
knocked out. Perhaps you will see yourself taking 
a backflip in the diving contest, or your room- 
mate playing tennis. At any rate it will be 
Silver Bay; and a splendid chance to live over 
again the good times and the inspiring life of 
those ten days; and a good chance too for those 
who have never been there and those who hope to, 
to get an idea of what Silver Bay really is. 

The movies will be given in the Barn, on Wed- 
nesday evening, April 21, 1920. They are to be 
given under the auspices of the C. A. mid-week 
meeting. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



Udellesle^ Colleoe IRews 



Editor-in-Chief Mary C. Dooly, 1921 

Board of Editors 

Associate Editors 
Clemewell Hinchliff, 1921 
Elizabeth Sayre, 1921 

Assistant Editors 
Alice Hackett, 1921 Emelie Weyi, 1929 

Eleanor Perret, 1921 Elizabeth Woody, 1922 
Dorothea Comly, 19®2 Dorothy Williams, 1922 
Beatrice Jeffersfn, 1922 Elizabeth Sanford, 1923 
Dane Vermillion', 1923 



Business Manager Dorothy Bright, 1921 

Business Staff 
Circulation Manager 
Amelia DeWolf, 1921 

Advertising Manager 
Susan Graffam, 1922 

Assistant Business Manager 
Alice Richards, 1922 



•OUBL.ISHED weekly during the college year by a board of students of Wellesley College. Subscriptions one 
* dollar and fifty cents per annum in advance. Single copies five cents each. All contributions should be in the 
News office by 9 A. M. on Monday at the latest and should be addressed to Miss Mary Dooly. All Alumna: 
news should be sent to Miss Laura Dwight, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. All business communications and 
subscriptions should be sent to the WELLESLEY College News, Wellesley, Mass. 
Entered as second-class matter, October 10, 1919, at the Post Office at Framingham, Massachusetts, under the Act 

of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in section 1103, Act of October 

3, 1917, authorized October 30, 1919. 



LAKIVIgW PRESS, P«LNT»M. FWAvWNaHAM. MASS. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE DEBATE AND THE 
FACULTY. 



"A long pull, and ia strong pull, and a pull all 
together" is, of course, the only formula which can 
turn the tide of Wellesley's fortunes in Inter- 
collegiate Debate. After this year's defeat, vari- 
ous plans are being made for a reorganized material 
committee, and for special composition courses for 
those interested in debating. The student body is 
preparing to pull together next year. 

But for a "pull all together," faculty as well as 
students must take a clearly defined part in this 
organized co-operation. When Wellesley debaters 
meet defeat year after year, the discredit falls 
upon the faculty as well as the students, and both 
faculty and students must act in sympathy if de- 
feat is to be- changed to victory. 

Faculty co-operation means only that the faculty 
adopt some clearly defined stand in regard to 
Intercollegiate Debate. At other colleges, such as 
Smith and Vassar, the Debate, we are told, is 
classified as academic work and is credited ac- 
cordingly. During the weeks of preparation for 
the debate, the debaters are allowed to postpone 
other academic work such as papers' and quizzes 
until after the debate. The whole faculty stands 
ready, to a man, to help the college on to success 
in every available way. 

But at Wellesley there has never been co-oper- 
ation from the faculty as a whole. Individual 
members of the faculty have, at times, excused 
debaters from written work until after the debate, 
but there is no established stand taken by the 
faculty on the subject. The result is that the 
debator hesitates to ask any favors from indi- 
viduals in the faculty because she can never be 
sure of the attitude she will encounter. When a 
student is spending every available moment upon 
preparation for Intercollegiate debate, she simply 
has neither the time nor the energy for feeling her 
way about among faculty principles and pre- 
judices. 

Wellesley must win next year. But Wellesley 
cannot win unless the guiding members of our 
community, the faculty, pull with the students. 
All that is being asked is that Wellesley be al- 
lowed faculty support equal to that in other col- 
leges whom she encounters. 

Debating is a game, the best sort of a game. 
But fair play demands that neither team compete 
hampered by a handicap of divided faculty sym- 
pathy. 



PUBLIC OPINION. 

It has been often said that the greatest danger 
to a country lies in the indifference of the average 
citizen. Unless his own rights are infringed upon, 
he has little interest in the workings of law, the 
processes of government. What is true of the 



public in general is equally true of the members 
of Wellesley College. 

No one can question the power of that intangible 
influence called public opinion. Most people reg- 
ulate their lives in accordance with it — 'they say' 
that such and such is ridiculous, and, something 
else not the thing to do, and still another, 'the 
very latest.^ Were the force of this general 
opinion directed towards some of the actual, we 
might almost say vital, questions that face the 
college, Wellesley would certainly be a saner, 
healthier community than it is now, where criti- 
cism is underground and self-interested. The only 
subject on which everyone pronounces openly her 
honest opinions is the weather. 

The college has just completed the elections of 
officers for next year. . It was actively interested 
at the time. Will it continue so? Will those 
students charged with leadership in college ad- 
ministration feel back of them an intelligent, 
honestly critical, openly concerned body of young 
women? Will there be strong public opinion for 
actual acceptance of the responsibilities of self- 
government? We are not asking for entire unan- 
imity of opinion. But there are certain principles 
everyone accepts theoretically. We demand that 
each student have some opinion honestly arrived 
at in accordance with those principles put into 
practice. There is no force greater than that of 
public opinion once mobilized. Then only can col- 
lege government be successful. 



CORRECTION. 



The News regrets several errors in fact which 
appeared in the Free Press entitled '^Censoring" 
in the March 11 issue, and wishes to correct them. 
The article said that the Press Board worked 
under the censorship restrictions' — a statement 
which a survey of the Press Board rules proves to 
be untrue. The News is not under the control of 
a censor as the statement "the editor is constantly 
harassed by the spectre of Censorship" gives one 
to understand. The exclusion of men guests from 
the Barn plays is not a question of girls' wearing 
men's costumes but of keeping a distinction be- 
tween major and minor performances. Barn 
plays, since they are classified as minor perfor- 
mances, are limited in their number of guests. 



FREE PRESS. 

All contributions for this column must be signed with 
the full name of the author. Only articles thus signed 
will be printed. Initials or numerals will be used in 
pr i ntln £ articles if the writer so desires. 

The Editors do not hold themselves responsible for 
opinions and statements which appear in this column. 
.. b A r 'butions should be in the hands of the Editors 
by 9 A. M. on Monday. 

I. 

Why Parody the Bible? 
Let's hold some things sacred and keep them 
as untarnished as they were when they were en- 
trusted to us. I don't think that we've had a 
parody on "Alma Mater" yet. It is a comfort to 



be able to find something that has not for you, 
any belittling associations. I'm in favor of put- 
ting the Bible on the same level and observing a 
distinction that was overlooked in the News of the 
18th of March, between the Parliament of Fools 
and 1 Corinthians 13. 

'20. 
II. 
Society Self-Destruction. 

Does the college realize the significance of the 
new society plan which has recently been passed 
by the six societies with so light consideration and 
so slight opposition? After all our years of dis- 
cussions and plans for reforming societies we have 
voted to try this plan merely because "anything is 
better than the present system," or because "it is 
only for a year and the committee has worked so 
hard on it." We realize that the committee which 
formulated this plan did spend much time and 
thought on it, but we believe that the plan which 
they submitted cannot accomplish its purpose. 

The new plan hopes to improve the work of the 
societies in order that they will be of more value 
to the college. With a few exceptions society 
members admit that the present work of societies 
is not vital to them as individuals, let alone to the 
societies or to the college. This sort of work can- 
not be made the basis of congeniality for the 
society. The exponents of the plan claim that the 
work of the societies should and will be the basis 
of membership in the societies. It seems obvious 
that most people are not going to apply for mem- 
bership in a society because of its work. They 
will apply because they happen to know the girls 
in the society. And so we will get back to the 
same old question of the justice of limiting the 
members. It seems to us that there is no work 
the societies can take up which will be vital to them 
and valuable to the college without reduplicating 
the work of another college organization. If the 
work is the basis of societies then let us see the 
News, the Barn, and the Debating Club installed 
in the society houses. 

If the work is not the basis and if the function 
of societies is primarily social, then where is any 
possible justification for reducing the membership 
of a society to thirty-five in a year when we still 
have no Student-Alumnae Building to care for the 
needs of the rest of the student body? If societies 
are social then certainly we should be considering 
extending the membership rather than curtailing it. 

The new method of application under the system 
has its merits, but the result will be small con- 
genial groups enjoying the social privileges of the 
houses, since the present work cannot be the basis. 
We see only one good thing in the plan which will 
get at the fundamental question; that it carries 
with it its own distraction and brings nearer the 
inevitable end of a society system which is con- 
trary to the ideals of Wellesley. 

E. S. B. and H. B. R. 
III. 
Answer to D. C. 

Why does not D. C. buy the novels she wishes to 
read? The answer is easy to guess. But could 
not the College make a like answer? Public libra- 
ries buy the books that the public wishes because 
the public taxes itself to pay for them. 

M. S. C. 
IV. 
Is There Hope for Armenia? 

It seems rather queer that, during this nation 
wide excitement over the Armenian situation at 
such a critical time, no slightest mention of it has 
been made at Wellesley. The recent Turkish 
massacres of thousands of helpless Armenians have 
turned all eyes to this unfortunate country. Be- 
fore the war, Armenia was divided into three parts, 
Turkish, Russian and Persian Armenia. Armenia 
was on the Allies side during the war, and when 
peace came, she pleaded that she might be estab- 
lished as a nation. Now the Allied Council has 
(Continued on page 4, column J) 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 




"W^ >v -ii<V:;$ 




'.%:-.sr£SE£2tf 



A casting for one of the 

huge water-wheel driven 
generators installed in the 
Mississippi River Power 
Company's plant at Keo- 
kuk. This installation will 
ultimately consist of thirty 
of these machines, giving 
a total capacity of 216,000 
kilowatts (300,000 horse- 
power). It is the largest 
hydro-electric development 
in the world. The General 
Electric Company builds 
generator for water-wheel 
drive in sizes ranging from 
37% to 32,500 kilowatts and 
the aggregate capacity of 
G-E units now in successful 
operation is in excess of 
four million horse-power. 



Mississippi River Power 
Company, Keokuk, Iowa 



- >>■' 



■*&* 



;*> : w<* > .'-_,;.^ ;*.«,/. 



\&ii$& 



Utilizing Nature's Power 

ELECTRICAL energy generated by water 
power has grown to be one of our greatest 
natural resources — and we have only begun to 
reach its possibilities. It mines and refines our 
ores, turns the wheels of industry, drives our 
street cars and lights our cities and towns. The 
power obtained from Nature saves many million 
tons of coal every year. 

At first the field of its utilization was limited by the dis- 
tance electricity could be transported. But soon research 
and engineering skill pointed the way to larger and better 
electrical apparatus necessary for high-voltage trans- 
mission. Then ingenious devices were invented to insure 
protection against lightning, short-circuits, etc., which 
cause damage and interrupt the service. And now all over 
the country a network of wires begins to appear, carry- 
ing the magic power. 

The General Electric Company, with its many years' ex- 
perience, has played a great part in hydro-electric develop- 
ment. By successfully co-ordinating the inventive genius 
of the company and its engineering and manufacturing 
abilities, it has accomplished some of the greatest achieve- 
ments in the production and application of electrical 
energy. 

The old mill wheel of yesterday has gone. Today the 
forces of immense volumes of water are harnessed and 
sent miles away to supply the needs of industry and 
business and the comforts of the home. 




General Office 
Schenectady, N.Y. 



Sales Offices in 

all large cities, ss-wsd 



NEW PLAN ADOPTED BY SOCIETIES. 
(Continued from page 1, column 1) 

has been taken the president shall send to the Cen- 
tral Committee the list of names arranged in order 
of the society's preference. The Central Commit- 
tee, having its lists from the six societies 1 , shall then 
assign individuals to societies, meeting the desires 
of both the individuals and the societies. No stu- 
dent shall be assigned to a society to which she has 
not applied for membership. The Committee shall 
inform the societies of their assignments and the 



societies shall send out invitations for membership 
to those girls. 

Sophomobe Membership Considered. 

In the plan as suggested by the Committee Ave 
sophomores were to be elected to restricted mem- 
bership in each society in the spring term. By 
definition, "restricted members shall have voting 
power; they shall enter society houses only for 
regular and official meetings of their societies and 
for diities connected therewith; they shall not give 
or attend private parties in society houses." 

This question of society membership aroused 



much discussion and adverse criticism. It was de- 
cided, however, not to include sophomores this year 
because of the difficulties attendant on the reduc- 
tion of the present number to the desired thirty- 
five. 



For the sake of certain members of 1921, who 
find the full expense of cap and gown burdensome, 
I the request is made that anyone who has these 
articles for sale at a low price, or perhaps to give 
away, will make known the facts to Miss Caswell, 
No. 1, Administration Building. 



THE GREEKS AND A LEAGUE OF 
NATIONS. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



"Why did not the ancient Greeks establish a 
league of nations?" was the question upon which 
Professor William Scott Ferguson of Harvard 
University spoke at Billings Hall at 8 o'clock on 
April ninth. Even though the Greek city states 
had all the attributes of a nation, such as common 
language and common ideas, they lacked the 
desire to come under the same government. By 
380 B. C. philosophers, the most emminent poli- 
tical economists of their times, recognized the 
need of a league. But the Macedonians, Persians, 
and Romans overcame, in turn, the partial Greek 
Alliances which were formed. Professor Ferguson 
pointed out the historical development of Greece 
which prevented a league of nations. The democ- 
racy of the city states and the long stretches of 
desolate country which lay between the towns were 
the main difficulties. There was no possibility of 
easy political intercourse with either Hellenic or 
external nations. The freedom of the city state 
could only be stretched as far as that city for, 
as Professor Ferguson said, "the nation was only 
as large as public opinion." Science has provided 
the modern world with the means of communica- 
tion which the Greeks lacked and by its agencies 
a "neighborliness" can be attained with which a 
League of Nations may succeed where that of the 
Greeks would have failed. 

Is There Hope foe Armenia? 
(Continued from page 2, column 3) 
recently decided to split Armenia into four sec- 
tions. By this proposal the richest part of all, 
bordering on the Mediterranean Sea is to be given 
to France. The north western portion is to be 
added to a prospective Kurdish state under Great 
Britain's control, so that English territory in Mes- 
opotamia may be connected with the Black Sea. 
A third part is left to Turkey, and what remains, 
a small section shorn of the richest lands, is to 
be an Armenian state. Thus all chances of an 
Armenian nation are in danger of being obliter- 
ated, and the Turks may be given another chance 
to murder Armenians. It is for public opinion to 
express its indignation at this belial of lofty 
principles by the diplomats of the Allied Council. 
Public opinion has been expressing disapproval, 
and the conscience of American citizens should 
go on and push the none too eager senate into 
taking a stand against this shameful arrangement. 
Armenia should be one state. Above all, the Turks 
should have no more control in Armenia. Strong 
enough barriers should be raised against Turkey 
to make certain that the atrocious massacres which 
have just been carried out, and carried out re- 
peatedly in the past, can never never happen again. 

J. C. A., 1921. 



LOST — Two A. K. X. pins; one on Washington 
Street near Noanett, marked T. W. Strauss, 1919, 
the other, somewhere on campus, ' marked M. L. 
Alcock, 1920. Finder please return to M. L. Al- 
cock, 330 Tower Court. 



SCIENTIFIC CHARACTER If 

J ANALYSIS BY HANDWRITING H 

Detailed and accurate information, SI 

portraying the practical and senti- 1J 

mental sides of yourself or friends. [I 
Send specimen and $1.00 to 

Kathaeyn Gibson Lewis 

318 West 84th St., N. Y. |[ 
1 Recent Character Analysis Editor of II 
the N. Y. Evening World. 

wuiiwiiiiuiuiiiii mini tun iiiiiniimii tn inn mini i <■•■ it •< i< ■ u u nj r« i iih '!'!!!! !!'» i m'n 'Ii'li ',",',", , ", , Ji I g 




Engagement Gifts Wedding 'Presents 

A New Display of 
SPANISH COMBS and HAIRPINS 

Jeweled and Plain 

Fascinating chains to match your spring clothes. 
Spring novelties of all kinds. 



Sue jRjce Studji 



w 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



BON WIT TELLER 6, CO 



£7Ae c5fi>ecia/tt/ cS/iop of * O/iauia&oad 
FIFTH AVENUE AT 38 TH STREET, NEW YORK 




Jin Jlssemblage of 'Distinguished 

MISSES SPRING FASHIONS 

to be exhibited at the 

Wellesley Inn 
April 19th, 20th, 2 1st 



The naive charm and spirit of youthfulness is ingeniously 
reflected in these specialized modes for the college miss. 



FROCKS — GOWNS — COATS — WRAPS 
SUITS — BLOUSES — SWEATERS — SKIRTS 
SPORT HATS — SPORTS APPAREL 
LINGERIE — NEGLIGEES — FOOTWEAR 

Jlnd the minor accessories and ap- 
pointments for the well dressed miss 




THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 




THE- PARLIAMENT- OF* FOOLS 



A PRAIRIE FLOWER ENRAGED. 



Ere his Senior Year at Princeton, Tommy was en- 
gaged to marry 

An attractive girl at Wellesley, whom he called 
"my little Carrie." 

Senior voting came to Princeton; Carrie mailed 
the youth his ring, 

Said the contents of his ballot stopped all thought 
of marrying. 

Tommy bore the information with profane, unholy 

grief, 
Swore in accents wild and fervent (guaranteed 

to bring relief) 
Wrote a letter to fair Wellesley saying — "If you 

really must berate 
One who always loved you dearly, Carrie, please 

elucidate. 

"Kindly tell me why you left me? Why have you 
been so unkind 

As to blame my Senior ballot just because you 
changed your mind? 

You'd have loved the little ballot, 'twas a master- 
piece I tho't, 

Until I beheld the havoc that its policy has 
brought. 

Favorite name for girl they asked us, height and 

color, age and weight, 
And I just described you, Carrie Burr, a girl to 

imitate. 
And you say you threw me over 'cause you 

did not like my vote. 
Please send explanation special. — Thus it was that 

Tommy wrote. 

Two days later Senior Tommy read this letter 

from his Miss: 
"Horrid man, do you recall there was a question 

much like this — 
'•Kindly state (a first choice only) which girls 

college you prefer' 
You know well that I'm a Wellesley. You chose 

Harvard. 

Signed C. BtntR." 



OUR MATHEMATICAL MINDS. 



1st Sophomore: Say, what's the Bible lesson? 

2nd ditto: Second Isaiah — at least, I guess 
that's what it is. Its the second time we've had 
it. 



WE NOMINATE FOR THE ELECTRIC 
CHAIR. 



1. The ringer of the 6:4.5 A. M. bell. 

2. The operatic felines who chant nocturnal 
arpeggios beneath the dorm windows. 

3. The man who runs the B. and A. 

4. The Phi Beta candidate who piously requests 
that the class receive the privilege of a weekly 
written review to keep the work fresh in its mind. 

5. The inventor of hash. 

6. The student who runs a seven seated car and 
never asks anyone to ride with her. 



A SUGGESTION. 



The inexperienced have been known to bring such 
alluring bits of feminine attire as straw hats and 
silk sweaters for the spring term at Wellesley, 
articles about as indispensable as is as electric fan 
to an Arctic explorer. For the benefit of the un- 
initiated we should like to submit in their place 
the following list. 

1. High rubber boots. 

2. Hot water bottles galore. 

3. Woolen gloves with a fur coat thrown in 
for good luck. 

4. An oil stove. 

5. A ticket home. 



THE LAST LONG GROAN. 



The following is verbatim testimony of various 
members of the Student Body, wailed in varying 
minor keys at various hours of the memorable day 
of Thursday, March 25. 

8 A. M. "I just have no ambition." 

11 A. M. "I'm all in." 

1 P. M. "You don't know the state of the 
nerves in this college." 

3 P. M. "I'm simply a wreck." 

4 P. M. "My knees are all sort of wobbly." 
6 P. M. "I feel like a dead jelly fish." 

9 P. M. "I couldn't last another day." 

10 P. M. "I've got to study for a report and a 
quiz the last hour before I go." 

12 Midnight. "I'm pursuing the academic !" 

E. C. M., '22. 



GETTING WARM. 

Physic Instructor: And what does water be- 
come when heated? 

Bright Student: Warm. 




A^"*- A TkJ Fashionable 
• Vjr^VI^I Ladies' Tailor 

Suits Made to Order Riding Habits a Specialty 

We also do all kinds of Cleaning, 

Mending and Pressing 

WELLESLEY SQUARE, Next to the Post Office 



WELLESLEY INN 

WELLESLEY, MASS. 

Afternoon Tea served from 

3 to 6 P.M. 



TAXI SERVICE 

Perkins Garage 

SUMNER FROST, Proprietor 

69 Central St., Wellesley, Mass. 



Telephone 
Wellesley 409 

Cars to Rent — Automobile Trips to White 
Mountains — The Berkshires — North and 
South Shores — Baggage Transferred to and 
from the station. Complete line of tires, 
tubes and automobile accessories. 

Look for cars marked E. O. P." 



OLD NATICK INN, 

SOUTH NATICK, MASS. 

Rooms with Bath Good Meals. 

Griddle Cakes with Maple Syrup in Tea 

Room — Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays. 

Telephone— Natick 8610 

MISS HARRIS, Manager 



WM?BMCH$E]RWIfE 




BOOKSELLERS 

AND 
STATIONERS 



471 FIFTH AY£- 

OPP. THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

SEND FOR BARGAIN CATALOG 




Dr. EBEN MOORE FLAGG 
Orthodontist 

558 Washington St., Wellesley 

Office Hours, 9 a. in. to 12 m. 2 to 5 p. in. 

Graduate of New York School of Dentistry. 

TELEPHONE, WIL1ES1EY 471— M 



Wellesley Fruit Company 

Don t forget to visit our store. 
One or the best stores m Wel- 
lesley. Carries a Full Line or 

FANCY FRUIT, GROCERIES 
and CRACKERS 

Phone Wellesley 138-W 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



Blumnae department 

The Editors are earnestly striving to make this de- 
partment of value by reporting events of interest to 
Wellesley Alumna; as promptly and as completely as is 
possible. The Alumna; are urged to co-operate by send- 
in°- notices directly to the Alumna! General Secretary, 
Alumna Office, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. 

ENGAGEMENTS. 

"13. Helen L. Sullivan to George Hazard Mead, 
of Providence, R. I. 

'1-1. Erniinie F. Ayer to Walter L. Reraiek, 
Harvard, 1909. 

'14. Evelyn Gough to Ross M. Bacon, of Mt. 
Yernon, N. Y. 

'17. Margaret Page Birch to Harold Freeman 
Barnes of Newark, N. J. 

'19. Susan U. Armstrong to Raymond B. Col- 
lins. 

MARRIAGES. 

'13. Waterhouse-Thom. On April 13, at Chi- 
cago, 111., Margaret Thoin to Mr. Charles A. M. 
Waterhouse. 

'15. Bell-Wilkes. On January 24, at Buffalo, 
N. Y., Miriam Wilkes to Dr. Samuel D. Bell, 
Princeton, 1913. 

'15. Ebbert-Williams. On February 6, at Ger- 
mantown, Pa., Helen E. Williams to Mr. Ralph 
Ebbert. 

'16. Rogers^Grove. On April 8, at Pittsburg, 
Pa., Martha Tosh Grove to Dr. Harry Lincoln 
Rogers. 

'17. Gordon-Jones. On February 28, in New 
York City, Mildred Larcom Jones to Attorney 
Spencer Gordon of Washington, D. C. 

'19. McCabe-Johnston. On April 7, at Boston, 
Mass., Sara Elinor Johnston to Mr. Richard 
Snowden McCabe. 





WRITE FOR YOUR COPY OF ) 

Fifth Avenue 

FASHIONS 

for Spring &? Summer 
A Book of Smart Modes In 
HATS - DRESSES ■ COATS 

Post-paid on Request to 





349 Eifih^tienue 
New York 




SCHOLARSHIP 

Applications for the 



APPLICATIONS. 

Ruth Ingersoll Goldmark 




fellowship should be sent to Miss Margaret 
Sherwood before May 1. This fellowship of $250 
is offered to Wellesley graduates for work in 
English Literature, or in the Classics, or in both. 



BABSON OPPORTUNITIES PROMISING. 



When Mr. Roger Babson of the famous Babson 
Statistical Organization in Wellesley Hills used 
his "first opportunity to address Wellesley College 
girls" Friday afternoon, April 9, in Founders 
Hall, he gave them a very helpful and enlighten- 
ing sketch of possibilities for working with him 
there. Tabulating reports, making of oneself an 
expert in such lines as stocks, bonds, strikes, act- 
ing as field agent in large cities, or serving as 
"secretary-nurse" for the young students at Bab- 
son Institute (a school for business executives) 
were the lines open. As essential preparation Mr. 
Babson suggested Economics, English Composi- 
tion, and Stenography in addition to possessing 
"loyalty, pep, and sticktoitiveness." Two of his 
associates gave amplifying reports and upon Miss 
Caswell's invitation there were interested questions 
from the audience which Mr. Babson answered 
entertainingly but very adequately. 



TREO GIRDLES 

AND 

DANCING CORSETS 

— At— 

Madame Whitney's 

ROOM 29. Up One Flight. THE WABAN 

New and Beautiful Lingerie 

Philippine and French Gowns and Chemises 

High Grade Silk Stockings in all colors 

Lovely Negligees and Jackets 

COME AND SEE THEM 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



BIRTHS. 

'04. On January 21, a son, Robert Morris, to 
Jessie Goff Talcott. 

'04. On March 23, a daughter, Elizabeth, to 
Ella Tuttle Hand. 

'08. On June 14, 1919, in Medford, Mass., a 
son, Donald Thompson, to Helen Thompson Shedd. 

'09. On January 16, a daughter, Constance 
Harriett, to Lorraine Eaton Alexander. 

'10. On March 20, in Scranton, Pa., a son, 
Tiffany Millar, to Eva Millar Jones. 

'16. On April 6, in Syracuse, N. Y., a daughter, 
Jean, to Margaret Claflin Porter. 

'16. On March 22, in East Williston, N. Y., a 
second daughter, Clara Julia, to Lydia Oakley 
Carman. 

ex*'17. On January 25, in Kingston, N. Y., a 
son, William Newton, to Esther Carl Fessenden. 



DEATHS. 



'97. On January 13, at Newton Centre, Mass., 
Mrs. Charles Prescott, mother of Nellie G. Pres- 
cott. 

ex '07. On April 2, at Forest Hills, N. Y., Mr. 
Rowland H. Smith, husband of Jessie Cooke 
Smith. 

'08. On March 23, at Roxbury, Mass., mother 
of Marion G. Earle. 

'10. On February 4, at Scranton, Pa., Mr. 
George V. Millar, father of Eva Millar Jones. 

'10. On March 24, at Mercer, Pa., Mr. A. W. 
Williams, father of Helene Williams Carpenter. 

'13. On 'March 23, at Bangor, Maine, Mr. D. 
Lyman Wormwood, father of Alice E. Wormwood. 



CHANGES OF ADDRESS. 



'10. Mrs. Charles D. Ensign (Inez Skinner) to 
1877 Colonnade Rd., N. E., Cleveland, Ohio. 

'13. Mrs. Charles A. M. Waterhouse (Mar- 
.garet Thorn) to 1109 East 52nd St., Chicago, 111. 

'15. Ruth K. Benton to 126 East 39th St., New 
York City, June 1 to October 1, Little Boars' 
Head, N. H. 

'15. Mrs. Samuel D. Bell (Miriam Wilkes) to 
15 East 10th St., New York City. 

'15. Mrs. Ralph Ebbert (Helen E. Williams) 
to 39 Argyle Road, Brookly, N. Y. 

'16. Mrs. Harry Lincoln Rogers (Martha T. 
Grove) to Riverton, N. J. 

'17. Mrs. Mathew H. Guthrie (Flora Taft) to 
Ozark, Arkansas. 

'17. Mrs. Spencer Gordon (Mildred Jones) to 
2007 O St., West, Washington, D. C. 

'19. Mrs. Richard Snowden McCabe (S. Elinor 
Johnston) to Salem Inn, Salem, Mass. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



In as much as it has pleased God in his infinite 
wisdom to take from us our friend and classmate 
Elaine Marshall, 1917, we desire to express our 
sorrow and sense of loss. Her friendliness and 
loyalty have won her many friends. 

Frances Egan Irving, 1912 
Charlotte Henze Harris, 1913 
Marguerite S. Ickler, 1917 



TWO CENTS FOR FRANCE! 



This week Wellesley is holding her campaign for 
the Gift to France. All over the country people 
have been contributing the few pennies asked for 
the memorial that is to be placed on the battle- 
field of the Marne. It is to commemorate the 
stand there of the Americans with the French. 
Such a plan should win universal support. Chair- 
men in each dormitory are collecting the two 
pennies asked of each girl in college — Let every- 
one in Wellesley have a share in America's Gift to 
France. 




Blouses, Gowns, Suits, 
Coats, Sweater Coats, 
Skirts, Silk Petticoats 
and Furs. 



Meyer Jonasson & Co. 



BOSTON 



TREMONT" and BOYLSTON SXS. 



NEW YORK 
2814 Broadway 



PARIS 
22 rue St. Georges 



WASHINGTON 
924 F. St. N. W. 



TRENTON 
38 E. State St. 





AT 



$22. 75 

A Crisp, Trim 
Organdie Frock 



Our Policy — 



Of presenting to the Wellesley woman frocks in the height of 
fashion, at prices well within the limits of the average purse, 
begins with our Fashion Fete at The Waban Hotel, on April 
26, 27, 28. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 




""■ "■ i 11. ■ 



Elizabeth H. Cox, "20, has been awarded a Uni- 
versity Scholarship in History by the Graduate 
School of the University of Pennsylvania for the 
academic year 1920-1991. 

Mrs. Hodder was at Mt. Holyoke College for 
the week-end where she gave a lecture to the 
members of the history department on "Cicero's 
Message to Our Own Times." 

ENGAGEMENTS. 

'20. Marjorie L. Perkins to Robert Campbell, 
Jr., Bowdoin, '16, and Harvard Theological Semi- 
nary, '17. 

'20. Ragni I.vsholm to John McKay. Lehigh, 
'17. 

'.'(I. Edna Bowen to Phillip Currier, Harvard, 
\'0. 

"22. Louise Leavitt to Edward Moore Davidson, 
Case School of Applied 1 Science, '17. 

"23. Jane Rosenheim to Charles Mayer, Colum- 
bia, '10, of New York City. 




MIDOIWCAR 



With cuffs and collar copen blue, 

This Nayvee Blouse is very new. 

The collar rolled quite deep and wide, 

A pocket neat that goes inside. 

It's cut so full and fits go neat, 

To wear this blouse is quite a treat. 




- - . -: : 



MIDOIWEAR 



N A Y V E E 
MIDDIWEAR 



Will be shown at the 
Fashion Fete of the 
Alfihen Service Shops 
to be held at The Waban 
Hotel, on April 26, 27, 
28. 



1 

I 



SPRING 

1920 



HATS 

New Models on Display 



IRRESISTABLE 

SELECT 

COLORFUL 



Riding and Sport Hats as Usual 



KORNFELD'S, ^ s — s ^ 



OUR SOLUTION .OF THE LABOR 
PROBLEMS. 



Now that the labor problem has descended upon 
Wellesley, there is a great scarcity of men for 
cleaning up the grounds. President Pendleton 
made an appeal in chapel to the girls, asking them 
to help in raking leaves and in putting campus 
in good order. Under the supervision of the 
Athletic Association, quite a number of squads 



of girls have been formed and every day they are 
busy raking about the grounds. The girls are 
paid thirty cents an hour for their efforts and 
they have besides, the satisfaction of being helpers 
when they are badly needed. 



LOST — Elgin watch— left at the gym, after an 
indoor baseball call-out the afternoon of the win- 
ter carnival. Will the finder return to 

E. K. Manchester. Stone Hall 



THE DRESS OF 
THE HOUR FOR 
THE' WOMAN OF 
TO-DAY 

A marked innovation 
in Woman's attire. 

Serviceable, 
practical, 
smartly tailored. 

Adapted to various 
materials. 

Catalogue upon 
request. 



23 W. 30 
K Y. C. 




10 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



COLLEGE CALENDAR. 



Friday, April 16th, 4.40 P. M. Billings Hall. 
Alumnae Association Senior Rally. 
7.30 P. M. Riding Hall. Preliminaries for. 

Indoor Riding Meet. 
8.00 P. M. Billings Hall. Reading by 
Charles Rann Kennedy and Mrs. Kennedy 
(Edith Wynne Mattheson), Alcestis of Euri- 
pides. (Department of Reading and Speak- 
ing)- 

Saturday, April 17th. Indoor Riding Meet, 7.30 
P. M. Riding Hall. 
Society Programme Meetings. 

Sunday, April 18th. 11.00 A. M. Memorial Chapel. 
Preacher, Dr. George A. Gordon of the New 
Old South Church, Boston. 
7.00 P. M. Vesper service, with address by 
Rev. J. Edgar Park of West Newton. — A 
Religion without Can't. 



THE HISTORY PRIZE. 



A member of the class of 1920 has offered a 
prize for the best piece of historical or political 
research to be presented by a senior this June. 

The conditions of the award are as follows: 

1. Any senior who is now or has been a 
student in the History department may submit 
work ten days before the close of the class exer- 
cises of the last semester. 

2. The work presented must be in so far as 
possible from primary sources. 

3. Particular attention must be given to form 
as well as to contents. 

4. The judges shall be chosen from the depart- 
ments of History, English, or English Literature, 
and from one other academic department of the 
college. If desirable they may associate with 
them a member from another college. 



THE 

WELLESLEY NATIONAL BANK 

WELLESLEY, MASS. 

The faculty and students of Wellesley College are in- 
vited to avail themselves of the privileges and services 
offered by this Bank, and the officers and employees are 
ever ready to render any assistance possible in connection 
with banking matters. 



C. N. TAYLOR, President 



BENJ. H. SANBORN, V.-President 



iX)UIS HARVEY, Cashier 



SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 



SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 



5. The name of the successful competitor will 
be announced at Commencement time. 

6. The judges reserve the right to refrain from 
giving the prize, if the excellence of the work' 
submitted does not justify its award. 

E. K. Kendlll. 



COLLECTION OF MOUNTED BIRDS. 

Bird-lovers will be interested to know that two 
collections of mounted birds, part of the begin- 
nings of a new Museum of Zoology and Physiology, 



are now housed in a basement room of the College 
Library. One of these collections is the gift of 
Mr. Henry W. Terry of Babylon, New York, in 
memory of his daughter, a former Wfellesley stu- 
dent. The other is a collection consisting largely 
of local birds, which was prepared by Mr. Edgar 
J. Smith of Sherborn, Mass., and which was pur- 
chased in 1919 under the direction of Dr. JMary 
A. Willcox, Emeritus Professor of Zoology. On 
one side of the room the commoner birds are ar- 
ranged on the basis of the time of their arrival or 
residence in Wellesley. 



For the 
Campus 



JUST the thing girls! A Beret 
Tam, made in Europe where 
the style originated. Woven 
in one piece, all wool, light 
weight, clings as lightly to the 
hair as a snowflake. 

Just the thing, too, to express 
vigorous class patriotism. Get 
your class to adopt them. Be 
the first to put over this new 
vogue in college headwear. 

Beret Tarns can be ordered in 
any one of the following colors 
through your local college 
dealer — 




COLORS: 
Cardinal 
Qolf Red 
~Navy Blue 
Copenhagen Blue 
Tan 

Receda Qreen 
Hunter Qreen 
Myrtle Qreen 
White 
Purple 
Sand 
Brown ■ 



If Your Regular Dealer Cannot 
Supply You Write Direct To 

HIRSCHBERG & COMPANY 

339 Fifth Avenue, New York 



Piano Players 

A CHANCE OF A LIFETIME IF YOU 
CAN WRITE A SONG. IF YOU HAVE 
ANY EAR FOR MUSIC AT ALL YOU 
MAY BE ABLE TO PUT MUSIC TO 
WORDS IF YOU HAD THEM. I HAVE 
NOW 3 SONG LYRICS AT 25 DOLLARS 
A PIECE. 

FOR PARTICULARS WRITE 

T\ J. KELLEY, 

81 WINTER STREET, HAVERHILL 
OR PHONE 4168 HAVERHILL 



Little Miss Muffet 
Sat on a tuffet 
Knitting a sweater gay 
Along came a spider 
And sat down beside her— 
And she dropped a stitch. 



Watch for our 
Silk Stocking Announcement 

THE YARN SHOP 

12 BROOKS ST. 
First street to the right beyond the squar